We know how it feels when you are first diagnosed with Parkinson’s and how your world is turned upside down. Parkinson’s affects everyone – your family, children, relationships and friendships.

We can point you in the right direction, chat to you and listen, and tell you about our experiences, struggles and triumphs if you want to hear them!

We hold regular coffee meet ups on Saturday mornings, a Popping for Parkinson’s session on Monday nights, plus regular social and fundraising events. We meet for drinks at regular times of the year in local bars or pubs – Susan Venner is an expert of great places to meet!

We recently received this from a new member who came to a coffee morning:

“A big fat thank you! Today changed my life. I had no idea I needed it so badly. I am ready to be put to work. Thank you.”

So come and join us in these relaxed settings to speak with those in similar situations and / or to simply have a good time.

Social Events

  • Popping for Parkinsons

    Popping for Parkinson’s by Simone Sistarelli on 4th Sep 2017 7:00:pm, at The Wimbledon Club

    This event occurs every Monday at 7pm (meet in bar at around 6.45 pm). Firstly, we have to thank The Monument Trust, which is part of the Sainsbury Family Charitable Trusts for their grant to cover these sessions. Popping for Parkinson’s has brought us all closer together as a group, plus our muscles have started moving again....

  • Christmas Drinks (Venue TBC) on 6th Dec 2017 7:30:pm, at

    Join us for some Christmas drinks from 7.30pm. Venue TBC.. If you would like to attend, contact susan.venner@slypn.org.uk by December 4 so we can cater accordingly. The wearing of Christmas jumpers is optional 😉

Other support groups

Here are some more groups, SLYPN is working with…

When I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s I made a commitment to myself to try everything that was suggested at least once be that speach therapy, nordic walking … or joining a network of fellow sufferers. I’m not the sort of person who normally joins clubs or groups so attending that first meeting was one of the most scary things I did in the maelstrom of emotions that occurred during the three to six months after I was diagnosed. What I found however was a group of interesting people and what I can only describe as quiet, understated support. The main topic of conversation, as we eat and drink our way round SW London’s restaurants, certainly doesn’t centre around the one thing we ostensibly have in common, but there’s always time for an informal chat, an off-the-cuff tip and some quiet reassurance. Our monthly meetings make me feel less alone as I face the latest stage of what life has thrown at me and I’m really glad I forced myself to give it a go”

Susie

“About a year ago I had my Parkinson’s diagnosis. What a shock! I’d been ill for years but nobody would tell me what was wrong. I immediately got on the Internet and tried to find out more. What I really wanted more than anything was to find somebody I could befriend that was in the same situation. With some trepidation I went to my first meeting in Clapham. I didn’t know what to expect so took my husband for moral support. I needn’t have worried everyone was so friendly. A few days after this I had an e-mail from Sarah saying she had met someone who I might like to get in touch with. So I found my Parkie friend. Sue and I have so much in common. We are a similar age, both were diagnosed about a year ago, we both work in education and would you believe it we both have daughters that work as French and Spanish teachers in London! More than I could have hoped for really. Sue and I have met up a few times but more importantly we are there for one another whether for a quick encouraging text or a pour your heart out phone call!”

Pauline